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Kalanchoe plant. How to grow and care for Kalanchoe

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How to grow and care for Kalanchoe

In the middle of winter, it’s hard to resist a kalanchoe covered with clusters of red, pink, or orange flowers. The flowers last several weeks and the plants are quite easy to grow. Native to Madagascar, kalanchoes thrive outdoors in zone 9 (and higher if in the dappled shade). When growing indoors, it is very easy to care for this plant, given enough sunlight. To celebrate the blooming of flowering kalanchoe, wrap the pot with colorful cloth or paper, tied with ribbon or raffia.

Kalanchoe facts

What is the meaning and symbolism of the Kalanchoe succulent plant

The most popular name of the plant is Kalanchoe. However, the plant has several common names such as Flaming Katy plant, Widow’s thrill plant. Some varieties of kalanchoe have their own common name, too. For example Devil’s backbone, Panda plant or pussy ears, Chocolate soldier plant.

Kalanchoe is the symbol of Persistence and Eternal love
Kalanchoe is the symbol of Persistence and Eternal love

Kalanchoe plant has flowers that are beautiful and last for at least 8 weeks. The plant is the symbol of Persistence and Eternal love. And because it requires very little care and can tolerate drought and filtered sunlight, it’s also a greate gift for any occasions

How to pronounce

One of the most frequently asked questions is how to correctly pronounce Kalanchoe. The correct pronunciation is ka·luhn·KOW·ee

It’s ka·luhn·KOW·ee

How to make a kalanchoe succulent to bloom again

Before a kalanchoe will make buds, it must be exposed to a series of long, sunny days followed by at least 2 weeks of short days, less than 12 hours long. This is easy enough to accomplish by placing plants outdoors in summer and then bringing them indoors in late fall, just before nighttime temperatures drop below about 40°F/4°C. After you bring the plant in, keep it in a room where no lights are used at night.

When brought into bloom naturally, kalanchoes flower in January and February
When brought into bloom naturally, kalanchoes flower in January and February

When brought into bloom naturally, kalanchoes flower in January and February. To speed up the schedule, cover the plants with a box for 14 hours each night for 14 consecutive days in early fall, and let them have moderate light during the day. Blooms will appear about 6 weeks later

What to do after the flowers has bloomed?

After the plant flowering, snip off bloom-bearing branches after the flowers fade to preserve the handsome good looks of this plant. The plant will bloom after that with proper care

Snip off bloom-bearing branches after the flowers fade
Snip off bloom-bearing branches after the flowers fade

Is Kalanchoe plant poisonous for cats or dogs

Kalanchoe plant is unfortunately toxic to both cats and dogs alike. It can make your dogs and cats experience diarrhea or vomiting. The plant leaves and sap has cardiac glycosides which are highly poisonous to cats. And since cat size is small, it can experience serious harm when eating the leaves or flowers

Kalanchoe plant is unfortunately toxic to both cats
Kalanchoe plant is unfortunately toxic to both cats and dogs

How to care for a kalanchoe

Light: Bright direct sunlight indoors; filtered shade outdoors.

Temperature: From late spring to early fall, warm to very warm (70–90°F/21–32°C). In fall and winter, cool to average (50–70°F/10–21°C).

Fertilizer: From late spring to midwinter, feed with an all-purpose houseplant food monthly. From late winter to early spring, do not feed.

Water: From spring to fall, keep the soil lightly moist. In winter, allow the soil to dry out between light waterings.

Soil: Any good potting soil.

Repotting: Repot annually in early summer.

Longevity: 2 to 3 years, or indefinitely when propagated from stem cuttings.

Propagation: When plants are more than 2 years old, take stem cuttings and set them to root in small pots in late spring

How to Care for Flowering Kalanchoes Indoors / JoyUsGarden

Varieties

There are 125 to 200 varieties of Kalanchoe and they look very different. In addition to flowering kalanchoe, other interesting species include:

  • Devil’s backbone (Kalanchoe Diagremontiana), which is also known as “mother of thousands” because of the way it produces tiny, rooted plantlets along its leaf margins.
  • Panda plant or pussy ears (Kalanchoe Tomentosa) features thick gray-green felted leaves with reddish markings.
Devil’s backbone or Mother of thousands
Devil’s backbone or Mother of thousands
Panda plant or pussy ears
Panda plant or pussy ears Kalanchoe

Summary

Kalanchoe is the go-to plant for beginners as well as veteran house planter alike. The flowers can last 8-10 weeks and look cute and irresistible. It’s also easy to propagate and can be a perfect gift for any occasion. If you have cats, if you’re careful to keep the animal away from the plant then there’s nothing to worry about.


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