Monstera plant care. How not to kill your Swiss cheese plant

Essential care for Monstera

Monstera Deliciosa is often called Swiss cheese plant, Split leaf philodendron, or Philodendron monstera. Mature Monstera plant develop rounded slits, or windows, in their leaves that resemble the holes in Swiss cheese. These holes help the plant withstand strong winds

Is Monstera plant easy to grow?

Monstera plant is easy to grow and tolerant of occasional neglect. This handsome foliage plant produces dramatically perforated leaves to 12 inches (30cm) long, or sometimes larger. A climber that attaches itself to a post with aerial roots, monstera makes a bold, vertical accent plant in large spaces. Over 7 years it can grow to 6–8 ft (1.8–2.4 m) tall.

Swiss cheese plant can can grow to 6–8 ft (1.8–2.4 m) tall over 7 years
Swiss cheese plant can can grow to 6–8 ft (1.8–2.4 m) tall over 7 years

What to expect when growing Swiss cheese plants indoor?

When grown outdoors in tropical areas, monstera produces edible fruit but plants seldom flower and fruit when grown indoors.

Healthy plants produce a steady parade of pencil-thick aerial roots, which gather moisture from the air. Secure roots that emerge near the base of the plant into the soil, and train others to cling to the plant’s post.

Monstera plants produce a steady parade of pencil-thick aerial roots
Monstera plants produce a steady parade of pencil-thick aerial roots

Is Monstera Deliciosa fruit edible? And where to buy one?

Actually monstera fruit is edible, but only when it ripes. A lesser-known fact is Swiss cheese plants sometimes called the “fruit salad” plant. The name comes from the fact that when ripped, Swiss cheese plant’s fruit is very delicious and it tastes like a combination of fruits in a fruit sale: banana, strawberry, guava, passion fruit, mango, and pineapple.

However, the fruit takes about 10 months long to ripe. And eating unripped fruit give your mouth and throat a burn because of Calcium Oxalate in unripped fruits. You can order the fruit online from a farm in Miami for 100-150$ a box

Is the Swiss Cheese plant poisonous for my pets?

The leaves of this plant are poisonous and can cause a severe burning sensation in the mouth if eaten by people or pets. If your pets accidentally eat the plant and show signs of distress, you can try to wash their mouth using running water, or take them to the vet.

The leaves of Monstera plant are poisonous for human and pets
The leaves of Monstera plant are poisonous for human and pets


Monstera plant essential care guide

  • Light: This plant prefers moderate to bright light, but no direct sun.
  • Temperature: Average to warm (65–85°F/18–29°C).
  • Fertilizer: From spring through summer, feed your monstera plant every 2 weeks with a balanced houseplant fertilizer. In winter, feed monthly.
  • Water: Allow the soil to dry to within an inch of the surface between waterings. Water less in winter than in summer.
  • Soil: A heavy mix comprised of 2 parts clean, bagged topsoil, 2 parts peat moss, and 1 part sand or perlite. Re-pot monstera every other spring. Keep plants in a large pot that provides room for the planting the aerial roots that emerge near the base of the plant. Mature plants require the support of a stout wood post.

What is better propagation methods for Swiss cheese? Step cutting or Air layering?

When the plant outgrows the space you have for it, propagate a vigorous stem tip by air layering or by rooting it as a stem tip cutting. Air layering is the easiest and most reliable method for monstera

You can also propagate monstera using bottles of water
You can also propagate Swiss cheese plant using bottles of water

How to bring out the beauty of Monstera plant?

There are many varieties of Monstera. Most plants have glossy, dark green leaves, but variegated forms are available. Over time, these may revert to all-green leaves. Young plants without windows in their leaves are sometimes sold as Philodendron pertusum.

To bring out the beauty of this plant, clean leaves often to keep them vibrantly glossy. This is an ideal floor plant for large spaces. It can fill the corner of a brightly lit room, or you can use it to divide space in large, open corridors.


Swiss cheese plant: Top 5 most common problems

Top 5 most common Swiss cheese plant problems

Monstera leaves has brown tips

CAUSE: Soil too dry.

REMEDY: Water more frequently, using rainwater or distilled water. If your monstera dries out completely, rehydrate pot…

New leaves are small or lack perforations

CAUSE: Too little light; too little fertilizer.

REMEDY: It is normal for young monstera plants to develop leaves without holes or slits, but when new leaves on older plants fail to develop perforations, the plant needs more light and fertilizer.

My monstera has yellow leaves and shrivel to brown

CAUSE: Natural in winter when temperatures and light levels are low. In summer, yellowing leaves are caused by uneven watering, which makes the soil too wet or too dry.

REMEDY: Clip off failing leaves with sharp scissors. Water more frequently to keep soil evenly moist.

My monstera has white cottony on stems and under leaves

CAUSE: Mealybug.

REMEDY: Isolate plant, and remove mealybugs with tweezers or a cotton swab dipped in alcohol. Repeat every few days until mealybugs are gone. The open growth habit of this plant makes it easy to remove mealybugs by hand.

Leaves pale, with faint webbing on leaf undersides

CAUSE: Spider mites.

REMEDY: Isolate plant, and thoroughly clean leaf undersides with a soft cloth or sponge dipped in soapy water. Repeat after a week. Regular cleaning of leaves will prevent this problem, as will keeping plants in a moderately humid place. Monstera is less likely than other houseplants to become infested with spider mites.


Conclusions

Monstera is the must-have plant in your house because of its handsomeness. It’s very beginner-friendly and can immediately add a tropical touch to your house. Make sure to follow the tips in this article and keep the plant out of reach of pets and children to have a healthy plant.

Zonal geranium care and overwinter guide

Zonal geranium is a common plant for the garden. There are also many showier varieties that make beautiful and rewarding houseplants. These special pelargoniums have graced sunny windows for many decades.

Leaf variegation often appears in halo patterns, with a red or bronze halo ringing the leaf’s center and white bands or splashes near the margin. Varieties with mostly green leaves are valued for their flowers, which often are produced year-round when plants are pruned periodically to force out new growth.

Three little known facts about Zonal geranium plants

What does Zonal geranium even mean?

Zonal geraniums get their name from the “zone” striping through the middle of their leaves. The colors are red, blue, or purple color. This physical attribute is a helpful way to distinguish a zonal geranium from other types of Geranium

Zonal geraniums get their name from the “zone” striping through the middle of their leaves.
Zonal geraniums get their name from the “zone” striping through the middle of their leaves.

How long can zonal geranium live?

Zonal geraniums can live up to 3 years. However, you can make it to live indefinitely by propagating it from rooted stem cuttings.

Where did geraniums come from?

Geranium originates from South Africa. At present, you can find more than 250 wild species of geranium still growing in Africa. The first geranium came to Europe at the beginning of the 17th century

At present, you can find more than 250 wild species of geranium still growing in Africa
At present, you can find more than 250 wild species of geranium still growing in Africa

Zonal geranium plants care guide

Light

Zonal geranium is one of the best flowers for full sun. They like to receive at least six hours of sunlight each day. I usually put mine in their favorite spot – a place with a lot of bright light from a south or west window.

Zonal geranium is one of the best flowers for full sun
Zonal geranium is one of the best flowers for full sun

Temperature

Zonal geranium temperature tolerance range is from cool to average room temperatures (60–75°F/16–24°C).

Watering and fertilize tips for geranium

Allow soil to dry to within 1 in/2.5 cm of the surface between waterings, but do not allow the roots to become so dry that the plants wilt.

I usually feed my geranium plants every 2 weeks with a balanced houseplant fertilizer in summer

Soil for geranium

Any good potting soil that drains well. I always add a handful of sand to standard potting soil to improve drainage when potting geraniums. Try to repot the plant annually in spring to provide a clean pot and fresh potting soil. This will give the plant a fresh start. It will reward you with a lot of flowers in summer

I always add a handful of sand to standard potting soil to improve drainage when potting geraniums
I always add a handful of sand to standard potting soil to improve drainage when potting geraniums

Propagation. How to grow geraniums from cuttings

When new growth emerges in spring, take 3–4 in/7.5–10 cm-long stem tip cuttings and root them. Some varieties are much easier to propagate than others.

How to coax bedding geranium into bloom?

Coaxing bedding geraniums, which also are zonal types, into bloom is very easy. In late summer, I gradually move outdoor-grown plants to shadier quarters to acclimate them to reduced light.

Coaxing bedding geraniums, which also are zonal types, into bloom is very easy

Even when acclimated, zonal geraniums often shed half their leaves when they are moved indoors, so it’s a normal thing. Don’t be alarmed. Clean up after them, and prune off up to half of the long, brittle branches. Blooming should resume after 3 to 5 weeks.

Geranium winter care. How to overwintering zonal geranium

I usually bring the plant inside in winter before the first frost
I usually bring the plant inside in winter before the first frost

Zonal geraniums can grow health in containers with little care. I usually bring the plant inside in winter before the first frost. You want to cut the plants half the normal size, dig it up and transplant into the container. Remember to inspect the plants for any sign of disease. I recommend using a potting mix that drains well. Throughout the winter, place the plants in a cool location with bright, direct sunlight. Water the plant as normal.

How to make geraniums flower in winter – John Lord’s Secret Garden

Display tips

Once-popular dwarf varieties with variegated leaves, such as Skies of Italy, are well worth seeking out. In addition, some zonal have scented leaves, including pink-flowered ‘Roger’s Delight’, ‘Prince Rupert Variegated’, and many others.

Roger’s Delight
Roger’s Delight
Prince Rupert Variegated
Prince Rupert Variegated
Ivy leaf geranium
Ivy leaf geranium
Horseshoe geranium
Horseshoe geranium

How to grow geraniums in pots

There are many ways to draw out the beauty of Geraniums. The easiest one is to grow geraniums in good quality terracotta pots that feature simple relief patterns.

Grow geraniums in good quality terracotta pots that feature simple relief patterns.

Geraniums are among the cheeriest plants you can grow in an office that includes a spot of bright sunlight. They will reward you with beautiful flamboyant flowers years around

How to plant geraniums in hanging baskets

When growing geranium in hanging baskets uses the standard good potting mix that drains well. Remember to let the soil dry 1-2 cms between watering. Hanging baskets of zonal geraniums can give a little Italian touch to your balcony

When growing geranium in hanging baskets uses the standard good potting mix that drains well

How I deadhead my geraniums

I always deadhead my geranium whenever I see the bloom look brown or weak. When deadheading your geraniums, you need to go snap the stem below its node or joint, where new growth begins. If you just simply pull off the top flowers, you missed the chance to promote new growth and bloom

Guzmania lingulata plant care. How to care for Scarlet star bromeliad plant

Guzmania lingulata plant care. How to care for Scarlet star bromeliad plant

Guzmania Lingulata plants are also referred to as Scarlet star plants. This is a popular plant of choice from the Bromeliad family. This plants’ native range in Southeast Mexico to Tropical America. Many older strains of scarlet start grew quite tall, but most modern named varieties are smaller, reaching a mature size of 10 in/25 cm tall and 12 in/30 cm wide.

This bromeliad has a rather upright posture, and its glossy green leaves add to its appeal. A flamboyant bloomer, in its third or fourth-year scarlet star, produces a brightly colored quilled spike, which emerges just above the foliage in the plant’s center. As the flower spike fades, usually 6 or more weeks after it appears, pups emerge from near the base of the Guzmania lingulata plant. Although scarlet star appreciates high humidity, it is less demanding of light than other bromeliads, and often grows beautifully in the bright artificial light of offices.

Guzmania lingulata produces flamboyant flower
Guzmania lingulata produces flamboyant flower

Guzmania lingulata plant specification

Light: Scalet star plants love moderate to bright year-round, with no direct sun; grows well with bright fluorescent light.

Temperature: Average to warm (65–80°F/18–27°C) year-round.

Fertilizer: Feed monthly year-round with a houseplant fertilizer mixed at half the normal strength. Feed leaves, roots, and reservoir.

Water: Keep a cup filled with at least 1 in/2.5 cm of water, and dribble enough water to the roots to keep them lightly moist. Empty old water from a cup every 2 to 3 weeks and promptly replace it. Leach pots once during the summer to remove accumulated salts.

Soil: Guzmania lingulata prefers bromeliad or orchid potting soil.

Scarlet star is very similar to orchid in term of caring
Guzmania lingulata is very similar to orchid in term of caring

Repotting: Repot annually in spring until the plant fills a 6 in/15 cm pot. Small pots help induce blooming in mature plants.

Propagation: Remove the offsets of your guzmania lingulata plant and pot them up when they are at least 3 in/7.5 cm tall. Maintain high humidity for a month after potting up the pups.

Guzmania Plant Care Tips: The Bromeliad
With The Vibrant Star Shaped Flower / JoyUsGarden

Display tips and Varieties

The handsome glossy leaves are spineless, so this bromeliad poses no danger when placed near activity areas. Moving a blooming plant to slightly lower light helps to intensify the color of the bracts. In order to draw out the beauty of the leaves, consider cleaning scarlet star leaves using damp cloth frequently.

There are numerous named varieties of Guzmania lingulata. The most popular is ‘Luna’, which produces a mauve spike. Others bloom yellow, red, or pinkish lavender. Varieties with reddish leaf markings often are not as vigorous as green-leafed selections.

Luna Guzmania lingulata
Luna Guzmania lingulata

Jerusalem Cherry plant care. How to care for Winter cherries

Jerusalem cherry plant (scientific name Solanum pseudocapsicum) is often called Madeira winter cherry, Chrismas cherry, or just “winter cherry”. A tough little house plant with red berries like fruits, Jerusalem cherry is related to tomatoes and edible peppers. However, the fruit is toxic and not edible, so advise children not to pick them, and keep them out of the reach of pets.

These safety precautions aside, Jerusalem cherry makes a versatile indoor plant in fall and winter. After a quiet show of starry white flowers, round, cherry-sized fruits start out dark green, then become Halloween yellow, and slowly ripen to red as Thanksgiving gives way to Christmas. In spring, the plant can be pruned back and placed in a cool place to rest. After the last spring frost passes, move it outdoors and it should regrow without delay.

Jerusalem cherry makes a versatile indoor plant in fall and winter
Jerusalem cherry makes a versatile indoor plant in fall and winter

Plants more than 2 years old often become brittle, so it’s a good idea to propagate stem cuttings from year-old plants. Easier still, gather the ripe fruits and plant them in a pot or on any piece of moist ground in spring. Seedlings will almost certainly appear, and these can be dug, potted up, and adopted as replacements for aged specimens.

Native to Peru and Ecuador, they can survive frosts and cold weather. They generally live up to 10 years, producing fruit usually in their second or third year, and every year after that. They are congeners of tomatoes and the fruit is extremely similar to cherry tomatoes in taste and texture, and are therefore easily confused with them

Jerusalem Cherry fruits is toxic for cats and birds

Fruit of Jerusalem cherry plants are poisonous to cats and some birds. Although the fruits are poisonous, it is generally not life-threatening to humans. When eaten it can cause some vomiting and gastric issues. For cats, it can be more lethal because of the size of the animal. Normally cats won’t eat the fruits, but in case your cat accidentally consumes the fruits, please take it to the vet. Read more on First Aid for Jerusalem Cherry Poisoning.

How long can Jerusalem Cherry plant live?

The Solanum pseudocapsicum Jerusalem Cherry plant can live from 2 to 3 years, or indefinitely when propagated from seeds or rooted stem cuttings. Normally you will want to revitalize the plant by propagation for every 2 to 3 years to keep it tidy and beautiful.

How to care for Jerusalem Cherry plants

  • Light: Bright, including direct sun for up to 4 hours a day.
  • Temperature: Average to warm room temperatures (65–75°F/18–24°C).
  • Fertilizer: From spring to early winter, feed monthly with a balanced houseplant food or a water-soluble tomato fertilizer. In late winter, no feeding necessary.
  • Water: Allow soil to become dry to within 1 in/2.5 cm of the surface between waterings, but do not let the soil become so dry that the plant wilts.
  • Soil: Any good potting soil.
  • Repotting: Repot young plants as they become rootbound until the roots fill a 6 in/15 cm pot. In spring, repot year-old plants to refresh the soil.

Propagation methods

Take stem cuttings in spring and root them in water or wet soil. Plants are also easily grown from seed gathered from shriveled fruits. Seedlings started outdoors in early summer bloom and set fruit the following fall.

The seeds are pretty cheap and easy to buy from Amazon

Display tips

Use sharp scissors to shape the plant before displaying it in a sunny window. A cloth wrapping placed over the pot can change with the fall and winter holidays, keying the plant to the most appropriate theme. This plant makes a great sidekick for a larger calamondin orange.

A cloth wrapping placed over the pot can change with the fall and winter holidays
A cloth wrapping placed over the pot can change with the fall and winter holidays

In addition to this species, less shrubby ornamental peppers (Capsicum frutescens) are sometimes sold as holiday plants. These are not as long-lived as Jerusalem cherry plants and should be discarded after their fruits are no longer attractive.

Common problems with Jerusalem Cherries and how to fix them

My plant blooms but does not set fruit.

Possible cause: Poor pollination.

How to fix: When grown outdoors, wind helps move pollen to where it is needed, but indoors there may not be enough air movement. Jiggle your Jerusalem Cherry plant a few times a day when they hold many open flowers or use a small dry paintbrush to dab the centers of the blossoms, which spreads the tiny grains of pollen.

Jerusalem plant bloom but not set fruits
Jerusalem plant bloom but not set fruits

The leaves are small and light green.

Possible cause: Insufficient fertilizer.

How to fix: Plants grown in pots need regular feeding. Increase the frequency of fertilizer application.

Jerusalem cherries plant does not bloom.

Possible cause: Insufficient light; too much supplemental light at night.

How to fix: These plants look best in winter when they enjoy strong outdoor light during the summer. They also fruit best in response to days becoming shorter in the fall. To support this process, leave your plant outside as long as possible, but do bring it in before temperatures drop to freezing.

The leaves are sticky; small insects are present.

Spider mites on plants
Spider mites on plants

Possible cause: Aphids, whiteflies, or spider mites.

How to fix: Gather fruits for replanting and dispose of the plant. Jerusalem Cherry plant is short-lived by nature, and it is easier to grow replacements than to restore the health of an infested plant.

Kalanchoe plant. How to grow and care for Kalanchoe

How to grow and care for Kalanchoe

In the middle of winter, it’s hard to resist a kalanchoe covered with clusters of red, pink, or orange flowers. The flowers last several weeks and the plants are quite easy to grow. Native to Madagascar, kalanchoes thrive outdoors in zone 9 (and higher if in the dappled shade). When growing indoors, it is very easy to care for this plant, given enough sunlight. To celebrate the blooming of flowering kalanchoe, wrap the pot with colorful cloth or paper, tied with ribbon or raffia.

Kalanchoe facts

What is the meaning and symbolism of the Kalanchoe succulent plant

The most popular name of the plant is Kalanchoe. However, the plant has several common names such as Flaming Katy plant, Widow’s thrill plant. Some varieties of kalanchoe have their own common name, too. For example Devil’s backbone, Panda plant or pussy ears, Chocolate soldier plant.

Kalanchoe is the symbol of Persistence and Eternal love
Kalanchoe is the symbol of Persistence and Eternal love

Kalanchoe plant has flowers that are beautiful and last for at least 8 weeks. The plant is the symbol of Persistence and Eternal love. And because it requires very little care and can tolerate drought and filtered sunlight, it’s also a greate gift for any occasions

How to pronounce

One of the most frequently asked questions is how to correctly pronounce Kalanchoe. The correct pronunciation is ka·luhn·KOW·ee

It’s ka·luhn·KOW·ee

How to make a kalanchoe succulent to bloom again

Before a kalanchoe will make buds, it must be exposed to a series of long, sunny days followed by at least 2 weeks of short days, less than 12 hours long. This is easy enough to accomplish by placing plants outdoors in summer and then bringing them indoors in late fall, just before nighttime temperatures drop below about 40°F/4°C. After you bring the plant in, keep it in a room where no lights are used at night.

When brought into bloom naturally, kalanchoes flower in January and February
When brought into bloom naturally, kalanchoes flower in January and February

When brought into bloom naturally, kalanchoes flower in January and February. To speed up the schedule, cover the plants with a box for 14 hours each night for 14 consecutive days in early fall, and let them have moderate light during the day. Blooms will appear about 6 weeks later

What to do after the flowers has bloomed?

After the plant flowering, snip off bloom-bearing branches after the flowers fade to preserve the handsome good looks of this plant. The plant will bloom after that with proper care

Snip off bloom-bearing branches after the flowers fade
Snip off bloom-bearing branches after the flowers fade

Is Kalanchoe plant poisonous for cats or dogs

Kalanchoe plant is unfortunately toxic to both cats and dogs alike. It can make your dogs and cats experience diarrhea or vomiting. The plant leaves and sap has cardiac glycosides which are highly poisonous to cats. And since cat size is small, it can experience serious harm when eating the leaves or flowers

Kalanchoe plant is unfortunately toxic to both cats
Kalanchoe plant is unfortunately toxic to both cats and dogs

How to care for a kalanchoe

Light: Bright direct sunlight indoors; filtered shade outdoors.

Temperature: From late spring to early fall, warm to very warm (70–90°F/21–32°C). In fall and winter, cool to average (50–70°F/10–21°C).

Fertilizer: From late spring to midwinter, feed with an all-purpose houseplant food monthly. From late winter to early spring, do not feed.

Water: From spring to fall, keep the soil lightly moist. In winter, allow the soil to dry out between light waterings.

Soil: Any good potting soil.

Repotting: Repot annually in early summer.

Longevity: 2 to 3 years, or indefinitely when propagated from stem cuttings.

Propagation: When plants are more than 2 years old, take stem cuttings and set them to root in small pots in late spring

How to Care for Flowering Kalanchoes Indoors / JoyUsGarden

Varieties

There are 125 to 200 varieties of Kalanchoe and they look very different. In addition to flowering kalanchoe, other interesting species include:

  • Devil’s backbone (Kalanchoe Diagremontiana), which is also known as “mother of thousands” because of the way it produces tiny, rooted plantlets along its leaf margins.
  • Panda plant or pussy ears (Kalanchoe Tomentosa) features thick gray-green felted leaves with reddish markings.
Devil’s backbone or Mother of thousands
Devil’s backbone or Mother of thousands
Panda plant or pussy ears
Panda plant or pussy ears Kalanchoe

Summary

Kalanchoe is the go-to plant for beginners as well as veteran house planter alike. The flowers can last 8-10 weeks and look cute and irresistible. It’s also easy to propagate and can be a perfect gift for any occasion. If you have cats, if you’re careful to keep the animal away from the plant then there’s nothing to worry about.

Peace Lily root rot disease and How to fix

Peace lily root rot is the most common disease

Peace lily plants are easy to grow and produce showy beautiful flowers. They are tough and resilient but susceptible to a few pests and diseases. Peace lily root rot is the most common one. Fortunately, it’s quite easy to fix if you take the correct action right away


What does root rot look like on Peace Lily plants?

Since Peace lily root is buried under soil, it’s hard to tell from the first glance if your Peace lily plant’s root is rotting away. There are two ways you can tell

  • Examine the plant
  • Examine the root

When looking at the plant, there are visible signs that telling you the plant is suffering:

  • Your peace lily plant looks droopy and yellow, wilting. This is because most of the root is rotted and the plant cannot get enough water and nutrition to the leaves
  • The soil is moist. One sign is that the leaves are still drooping even after you water the plant
Peace lily drooping even after watering
Peace lily drooping even after watering

If you see these signs you can carefully remove the peace lily plant from the soil and examine the root:

  • The root is squishy, looks small, unhealthy and black
  • Parts of the root is falling off when you touch it

With these signs, you now can be sure that your peace lily plant has root rot disease.

Rotting peace lily root
Rotting peace lily root
Healthy Peace lily root
Healthy Peace lily root

What cause root rot on Peace lily plant

There are many reasons that can lead to your Peace lily plant’s root rotting. But most possible causes are: overwatering and/or fungus

Over watered can cause peace lily roots to rot

One common mistake that house plant beginners have is watering their plants too much, and/or the containers don’t have a drainage hole. Thus leaving the root to sit on water too long

  • Water prevents the root from getting oxygen from the air and thus killing it off
  • Create a perfect environment for fungus and bugs to thrive causing all kinds of disease and problems with the plant

Root rot on Peace lily plant caused by fungus

Some times, the fungus can be transferred to your peace lily plant via infected soil or water. If your peace lily plant is weak and stressful. It will not be able to withstand the fungi. The reason for your plant to be stressful is numerous: overwatered, over-fertilized or the room is too hot, the humidity is too low. Even putting the plant constantly under air conditional can be a common cause for unhappy Peace lily


Treating Root rotting Peace Lily

The rule of thumb is you need to be quick and decisive when treating your Peace lily plant. The good news is that it’s not too complicated. If doing it correctly, your plant can bounce back good as new after several weeks and can grow new flowers. There are 3 essential steps to treat Peace Lily root rotting:

  • Remove the infected root part
  • Repotting correctly
  • Take good care after repotting the plant

Step 1 – Remove the rotting parts of the root

Remove the plant from the soil and remove the infected parts as soon as possible:

  • Remove the plant from the soil and remove exceed dirt on the root by washing it through by using clean running water. Do not use water that has chloride
  • Cut all the affected rotting roots of the peace lily plant by using a clean pair of scissors
  • Dip the root in fungus killer solution if possible

Step 2 – Repotting the plant

Repotting the plant using clean soil and clean container

  • The soil should be clean and dry. You should put the soil in direct sunlight for several days to dry if possible to kill all the
  • The container must have drainage holes in the bottom through which excess water can escape. It’s best to use a terra-cotta container because it dries quickly and improves air circulation.

Tips: You can grow the peace lily plant in clean water hydroponically for several weeks for the root to heal before putting it back into a container

Step 3 – Caring for Peace Lily after repotting

It’s crucial to take extra steps to care for your Peace Lily after the “surgery”. Besides the normal Peace Lily care below are some tips to make it easier for your plant to recover:

  • Do not overwater your peace lily plant. You should leave the soil to dry between watering
  • Do not fertilize your Peace Lily plant right away to reduce the stress of the plant
  • Discard the old soil and clean the old container, leave it in sunlight for several days if you want to reuse for other plants

Hopefully, after you follow the steps above, your Peace lily when recovering from the root rotting disease and rewards your hard work with shiny leaves and beautiful flowers.


Related articles

When and how to apply fertilizer for your plants

The primary energy force for plants is light, but they also need nutrients that support strong growth. Here are some fertilizer guidelines and helpful tips

When should I fertilize my plants?

As a general rule, fertilize plants whenever they are actively producing new growth, which for most plants is spring to fall when light levels are high. Plants kept under lights should also be fed in winter, but feeding plants that are resting in weak winter light can do more harm than good.

Apply fertilizer when the soil is moist
Apply fertilizer when the soil is moist

Apply fertilizer when the soil is moist. Plants that have been stressed by dry soil conditions may take up more nutrients than they can use when fertilized before they have a chance to rehydrate roots, leaves, and stems.

Avoid this when fertilize your plants

Withhold fertilizer from newly purchased plants or plants that have been moved to a new place, because the task of adjusting to new conditions is difficult enough without the additional pressure to produce new growth.

Withhold fertilizer from newly purchased plants
Withhold fertilizer from newly purchased plants

How often should I fertilize my plants?

As a broad general rule, wait at least 6 weeks after repotting plants in fertilizer-enriched soil before you begin feeding them again. Plants usually need no fertilizer for several weeks after they are repotted into potting soil that includes fertilizer.

Wait at least 6 weeks after repotting plants in fertilizer-enriched soil before you begin feeding them again
Wait at least 6 weeks after repotting plants in fertilizer-enriched soil before you begin feeding them again

Most potting soils do include a bit of starter fertilizer, and it is best to allow plants time to make use of these nutrients before giving them additional food. Knowing when to begin feeding freshly repotted plants is part of the grower’s art because several factors influence the rate at which the plants use the fertilizer, including light, temperature, frequency of watering, size of the root mass, and overall growth rate of the plant.

Types of fertilizers

There's are so many forms for fertilizer to choose from
There’s are so many forms for fertilizer to choose from

There’s are so many forms for fertilizer to choose from — liquid concentrates, powders, crystals, tablets that dissolve in water, spikes that are pushed into the potting soil, or time-release fertilizers, which are coated granules that slowly release nutrients as they dissolve.

Liquid fertilizer for plants

For most plants, the best choice is a liquid or mix-with-water powder or crystal form, which gives you tight control over how much fertilizer goes into the pot. One is no better than another, though liquids dissolve very quickly, and do not clump or melt when exposed to high humidity as powders and crystals sometimes do.

Liquids dissolve very quickly, and do not clump or melt
Liquids dissolve very quickly, and do not clump or melt

Both liquids and soluble powdered fertilizers are available as organic products, derived from natural materials, or you can use synthetic forms (plants don’t seem to be able to tell the difference). Spikes are quite unpredictable and should be used only when you anticipate a long absence when you must leave your plants in the hands of an inexperienced plant-sitter.

Slow release fertilizer

Very large, long-lived houseplants such as palms, Norfolk pines, and others that grow into small trees can easily be fed by scratching 1–2 tsp/5–10 ml of coated time-release fertilizer into the top .5 in/1.25 cm of soil.

You can also use a balanced organic fertilizer, which releases nutrients slowly as it decomposes
You can also use a balanced organic fertilizer, which releases nutrients slowly as it decomposes

You can also use a balanced organic fertilizer, which releases nutrients slowly as it decomposes. With either organic or time-release fertilizer, a small amount of fertilizer dissolves and moves down into the soil each time the plant is watered. Commercial growers use these products extensively, and you will often see a few round yellowish or greenish pellets on the soil’s surface of newly purchased plants. It is fine to leave these alone until you repot the plant. When you replace the soil, simply discard them along with the old potting soil in any convenient outdoor bed.

Flaming sword plant. How to care for Vriesea

How to grow and care for flaming sword plant
Flaming sword plant is one of the showiest bromeliads

Flaming sword plant is one of the showiest bromeliads. This houseplant features stiff, arching leaves banded with maroon, which form a tight vase in the center. Mature plants grow 20 in/50 cm tall and 24 in/60 cm wide.

  • Family: Bromeliaceae
  • Origin: Tropical America
  • Other names: Flaming Sword, Flaming Touch, Painted Feather, Zebra Bromeliad, Vriesea

Flaming Sword houseplants are not as easy to grow as some other bromeliads, but it will succeed when provided with bright light, warm temperatures, and moderate to high humidity. If all goes well, a 3- to 4-year-old plant will reward you with a tall, flattened flower spike, which is usually bright red, with small yellow flowers emerging from the bracts.

Flaming Sword houseplants are not as easy to grow as some other bromeliads, but it will succeed when provided with bright light, warm temperatures
Flaming Sword houseplants are not as easy to grow as some other bromeliads, but it will succeed when provided with bright light, warm temperatures

The spike persists for several weeks, after which the plant slowly declines while producing one or more offsets. Wait until the parent flaming sword plant is quite far gone to propagate a new plant from the pup.


Flaming swords prefer bright indirect light year-round, with some direct sun in winter

How to care for a Flaming Sword Plant

Light: Flaming swords prefer bright indirect light year-round, with some direct sun in winter.

Temperature: Warm (70–80°F/21–27°C) year-round.

Fertilizer: Feed flaming swords monthly with an all-purpose houseplant fertilizer mixed at half the normal strength. Feed the leaves, roots, and reservoir.

Water: Keep the soil lightly moist at all times, and refill the reservoir every 2 weeks with fresh water. Flaming sword plants prefer a humid room and mist weekly if possible

Soil: Flaming swords go well with Bromeliad mix or orchid potting soil.

Flaming swords go well with Bromeliad mix or orchid potting soil.
Flaming swords go well with Bromeliad mix or orchid potting soil.

Repotting: Repot young flaming swords after 2 years, and limit pot size for mature plants to 6 in/15 cm.

How long does flaming sword live?: Individual flaming sword plants live for 3 to 4 years.

Propagation: After flowering, the flaming sword bromeliad plant usually produces one robust pup. Allow it to grow until it is at least 8 in/20 cm tall before detaching it, potting it up, and discarding the parent plant.

Flaming sword plants develop new pup at the base of the plant
Flaming sword plants develop new pup at the base of the plant

Selections: There are many named varieties, which vary in leaf variegation and the shade of the flowering spike. Purchase plants that have not yet bloomed, or have just begun to produce a flowering spike.

Display tips: The dramatic leaf colors make the flaming sword plant a strong focal point even when it is not in bloom. Because of its width, it is a good plant to display on a raised platform, with smaller ferns or other low-light plants beneath it.

A 3- to 4-year-old plant will reward you with a tall, flattened flower spike
A 3- to 4-year-old plant will reward you with a tall, flattened flower spike

Croton plant. How to care for croton (codiaeum variegatum)

Croton plant. How to care for croton (codiaeum variegatum)
  • Common name: Croton
  • Other names: Joseph’s coat
  • Botanical name: Codiaeum variegatum
Today crotons are one of the most widely sold foliage plants
Today crotons are one of the most widely sold foliage plants

Technicolor croton plants have been grown outdoors in Florida and southern California for many years, but as houseplants, they proved difficult to satisfy. Then crotons went to Europe, where greenhouse growers gave them a makeover, selecting varieties that are much better adapted to low light. Today crotons are one of the most widely sold foliage plants, and because they are easily propagated in greenhouses, they are quite affordable as well.

Bold leaf colors that include yellow, orange, and yellow-and-green combinations are the hallmarks of crotons. Leaf color is most vivid when plants get plenty of light. Crotons also have a high transpiration rate, so they need frequent watering. Should you purchase a pot that contains more than one plant (which is not uncommon), plan to keep it as a cluster for a year. The second year, in early summer, separate the plants by cutting through the roots with a serrated knife, repot them, and keep them outdoors where they can bask in warm dappled shade for several weeks. Anytime croton becomes tall and lanky, you can cut off the top and root it like a stem tip cutting.


Croton specifications

Light and Temperature

Crotons love bright light. Croton plants benefit from spending summer outdoors in dappled shade. Three weeks before bringing plants indoors in the fall, move them to a shadier spot to acclimate them to lower light.

Croton plant prefer warm temperature (60–85°F/16–29°C)

Water, Soil and Fertilizer

Any good potting soil. Repot annually in late spring. Keeping plants slightly root-bound helps to control their size.

Keep the soil lightly moist at all times. Crotons like moderate humidity, and benefit from regular misting in winter, when indoor air is often very dry.

In spring and summer, feed every 2 weeks with a balanced houseplant food. In fall and winter, feed monthly.

Croton propagation

Root stem tip cuttings. When kept constantly moist at 70–80°F/21–27°C, croton cuttings root in less than a month.

Display tips

Wipe leaves often with a damp cloth to keep them glossy. Crotons are lovely when backlit by a sunny window. Many crotons named varieties are available with varying leaf shapes and colors. The croton most commonly sold in stores is ‘Petra’. Croton plants can live up to several years to indefinitely if propagated from tip cuttings every few years.

Crotons are lovely when backlit by a sunny window
Crotons are lovely when backlit by a sunny window

Common problems with croton and how to fix

My croton plant has new leaves which are small and green; lack color.

Your croton is having too little light; too little fertilizer or both. Try to move the plant to a brighter location and increase the frequency of fertilization.

Why do the leaf tips of my croton Petra turn brown?

Possible cause: Too much water. Try to water lightly yet frequently, and do not allow plants to sit in saucers of standing water.

My croton Petra’s older leaves drop off.

This is normal, but plants also may shed leaves if they are too cool, too wet, or too dry. No action needed if plants otherwise appear healthy and show new growth in spring and summer.

My indoor croton plant is bare at the base; lacks lateral stems.

Possible cause: this growth pattern often develops with indoor crotons. How to fix: Prune off the top in late spring and root the cutting. Meanwhile, the parent croton should produce lateral stems provided it is given plenty of light and warm temperatures.

My croton plant has white cottony masses on stems or leaf veins.

Possible cause: Mealybugs, which are common on crotons. Isolate plant, and follow control measures

Croton’s leaves are pale and limp; faint silky webbing on leaf undersides.

Possible cause: Spider mites, which infest crotons that are stressed by dryness, particularly dry air.

How to fix: Isolate plant, and follow control measures described on page 274. Increase humidity by misting plant often, and by keeping the plant on a tray of damp pebbles.

Dark discs on stems and leaf undersides of the croton plant

Possible cause: Scale. How to fix: Follow control measures. Inspect new plants closely for scale. If the infestation is severe, move plant outdoors for treatment if possible. If the problem arises in winter, consider disposing of the plant.

Infographic: How to choose the perfect Containers for your plants

The containers you choose for your houseplants are the only home they know, but they are part of your home, too. This balancing act — providing containers that meet the needs of your plants while also pleasing you with their presence — is not difficult if you keep a few fundamental guidelines in mind. These include size, drainage, and material.

We’ll dive into the details below, but we also put this info into this awesome infographic. Please help to share it so people can be more mindful when choosing containers for their plants.

Infographic: How to choose the perfect Containers for your plants

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Container garden guide. All you need to know about container

Size

How to choose the correct container size

Regardless of the material from which a container is made, its size should be proportional to that of its occupant. As a rule of thumb, measure the height of the plant from the soil line to the highest leaf. Divide this number by 3, and you have a good guess as to the ideal diameter of the container, measured in inches.

Choose containers in proper proportion to the size of the plant. A container that is about one-third as tall as the plant often works best
Choose containers in proper proportion to the size of the plant. A container that is about one-third as tall as the plant often works best

Choosing containers size for low-growing plants

This equation won’t work with low-growing, vining plants or small, squat cacti, so the next size-wise guideline is to choose the smallest container that will accommodate the roots of the plant.

Choose the smallest container that will accommodate the roots of the plant
Choose the smallest container that will accommodate the roots of the plant

There are two reasons to go small with containers. One is that small containers have a dwarfing effect on plant size, which is usually desirable under indoor conditions. Second, soil that is not employed in the service of roots tends to hold onto excess moisture, which in turn sets a tempting table for fungi that cause roots to rot.

Deep containers vs Shallow containers

Some plants with shallow surface roots do better in a low, squat container
Some plants with shallow surface roots do better in a low, squat container

The diameter of the top of the pot (the measurement between opposite edges) is usually about the same as its depth. However, some plants with shallow surface roots do better in a low, squat container.

Notice, too, that pots that narrow toward the base are prone to toppling over when planted with tall plants, though they are fine for small ones. Heavy pots with attached drainage dishes are often ideal for top-heavy plants. If a tall plant insists on tipping over, move it into a square planter that sits solidly in place.


Drainage

Several midsized drainage holes are better than one large one
Several midsized drainage holes are better than one large one

Whatever their size or shape, containers for plants must have drainage holes in the bottom through which excess water can escape. Several midsized drainage holes are better than one large one.

Many gardeners place a piece of screen over the holes to keep soil from coming out along with excess water, but it is better to leave the holes unobstructed. That way, you can check for the presence of roots growing out of the bottom of the pot, and if drainage problems develop you can reopen the holes by poking them with a skewer, awl, or pencil.

Line the bottom of the pot with a thin layer of pebbles or broken crockery when repotting your plants
Line the bottom of the pot with a thin layer of pebbles or broken crockery when repotting your plants

If soil loss is a big concern, simply line the bottom of the pot with a thin layer of pebbles or broken crockery when repotting your plants. A half-inch of loose pebbles or broken crockery improves drainage too.

Unfortunately, many beautiful brasses, ceramic, or hand-thrown pottery planters do not include drainage holes. Holes can be drilled into plastic or fiberglass, but don’t try this with fine ceramic or pottery. Instead, use these as cachepots, the term used to describe “containers for your containers.”

Place an inch of clean pebbles in the bottom of the cachepot, and set your plant in a container that can be slipped inside the drainless one. (It’s common to use a thin plastic pot for the inner one.) As long as the water is not allowed to form a deep puddle that keeps plant roots too wet, this double-potting system works quite well. If you accidentally overwater, be sure to drain off any excess that pools up in the bottom of the cachepot.

If a decorative container has no drainage holes, line the bottom with a layer of pebbles, and grow your plant in a well-drained container that can be slipped inside the prettier one and set on the pebble bed
If a decorative container has no drainage holes, grow your plant in a well-drained container that can be slipped inside the prettier one and set on the pebble bed.

Containers materials

When purchased, most plants are grown in plastic containers. Plastic is lightweight, holds moisture well, and seldom breaks as plants are packed and shipped. There certainly are attractive plastic containers, but those supplied by greenhouse growers are more practical than pretty. Once a plant has had a few weeks to adjust to conditions in its new home, a container upgrade is usually in order. Possible materials include clay, better plastic, fiberglass, and ceramic.

Terra-cotta clay pots

It is hard to criticize the handsome good looks of a healthy houseplant situated in the favorite choice, a clean clay pot set atop pebbles in a matching tray. Earth-toned clay pairs well with plants, and in the interest of uniformity, some people grow all of their plants in clay pots.

Earth-toned clay pairs well with plants, and in the interest of uniformity, some people grow all of their plants in clay pots
Earth-toned clay pairs well with plants, and in the interest of uniformity, some people grow all of their plants in clay pots

Because it dries quickly, clay is the preferred container material for plants that like periods of dryness between waterings, such as bromeliads and orchids. If you find that clay pots dry out too fast, you can paint their insides with paraffin or any color of latex paint. Or you can shop for dense Italian clay pots, which usually have “Made in Italy” stamped on the bottom. These cost more than comparatively porous Mexican-made pots and are usually a shade darker in color.

Plastic pots

Always supplying superior moisture retention, plastic pots come in a variety of colors and finishes. Those with a dull matte finish often must be tapped with a finger to see if they are ceramic or plastic! Many plastic pots also have snap-on trays, which do a great job of capturing water that drips from the bottoms of the pots (an especially desirable feature for hanging baskets). If you want a container in an unusual shape, such as an oblong box or a certain size of the pedestal, you are most likely to find it in plastic.

Plastic pots come in a variety of colors and finishes
Plastic pots come in a variety of colors and finishes

Glazed ceramic containers or fiberglass containers

Designed to look like fine clay or ceramic, these are usually the pots of choice for formal living rooms. Good-quality fiberglass containers can be costly, but with a little care, they will last a lifetime. Some contain enough metal to create a burnished finish, and fiberglass containers can be painted or antiqued if you want to make them fit a certain color scheme. Fiberglass containers are also quite lightweight, which makes them a top choice for large houseplants. Better garden shops carry fiberglass pots in a range of sizes and colors, including many that are replicas of classic Mediterranean styles. Select these with the same care you might put into choosing a piece of furniture.

Fiberglass containers are also quite lightweight, which makes them a top choice for large houseplants
Fiberglass containers are also quite lightweight, which makes them a top choice for large houseplants

Smaller plants are most appropriate for ceramic containers, particularly pots that include an attached or matching drainage tray. When protected from abuse, ceramic containers often outlive the plants they are partnered with, so keep versatility in mind when investing in ceramic pots. Neutral grays and browns are easy to work with and do not compete with plants for attention.

Smaller plants are most appropriate for ceramic containers, particularly pots that include an attached or matching drainage tray
Smaller plants are most appropriate for ceramic containers, particularly pots that include an attached or matching drainage tray

Some tips for choosing containers

When interior decor is your priority, it is usually best to choose the container before you choose the plant
When interior decor is your priority, it is usually best to choose the container before you choose the plant

When interior decor is your priority, it is usually best to choose the container before you choose the plant. Once the container and plant are in place, you may find that a third element, such as a small piece of statuary, works magic in bringing the composition to life.

Keep in mind that flat surfaces, such as floors, tabletops, and windowsills, are not the only places to keep plants. Various types of hardware — including hooks, chains, and fiber hangers — can be used to turn almost any container into a hanging basket, or you can use a container designed to be suspended from a hook. This is often a great way to give a plant bright light that might otherwise be wasted.

When installing a hook in the ceiling or mounting hanging hardware on a wall, make sure it is firmly anchored into a joist (the solid pieces of wood behind sheetrock). Otherwise, only very light plants, such as air plants, will be suitable for hanging.

Hanging containers are often a great way to give a plant bright light that might otherwise be wasted
Hanging containers are often a great way to give a plant bright light that might otherwise be wasted